PDF's Experts Weigh in on Internet & the Election of 2006

The Personal Democracy Forum has published a compilation of reax from Internet & politics types about what the 2006 cycle in the United States can tell us. You should always listen to Ethan Zuckerman (“there’s always something to talk about in an election”) and Chuck DeFeo (a consistently insightful commentator on the GOP’s use of new technology), as Doc Searls notes.

But note also the insights of others, including Benjamin Rahn, an articulate and passionate young force in online fundraising: “If 2004 was the year of the online donor, 2006 was the year of the online raiser. ActBlue made it possible for anyone, anywhere, to fundraising for the Democrats of their choice. The result: $16.5 million sent to over 1000 candidates and committees.”

Happy Election Day, and Come Blog the Vote at Berkman with BMG and others!

We’re delighted to welcome anyone blogging the vote today at the Berkman Center at Harvard Law School. The Blue Mass Group team have taken us up on it, live and in person, along with others swinging by, which is terrific.  Seth Flaxman of Demapples was here until he had class. Anyone and everyone of any political stripe is welcome. Just bring your laptop and we’ll provide the wifi and some things to eat and drink. Our address is 23 Everett Street in Cambridge, on the north side of the Harvard Law School campus. It’s a yellow-frame house. We’re up on the second floor. A map is here.

Each election day makes me rethink a hypothesis from 2004 on Internet & politics. There’s no doubt that more people are getting involved in politics through Internet activism than in previous cycles. The outstanding question, it seems to me, is whether or not Internet is making a difference in the political process. I’m inclined to say it is. And seeing those who are live-blogging the election here makes that case pretty clearly to me, anyway.

Our friends at the Center for Citizens Media and Stanford Law School have released an Election Guide for Bloggers, just in time to be useful.

Celebrating Those Who Blog the Vote

This afternoon, we’re welcoming all those who are covering the 2006 Massachusetts campaign cycle to a reception in your honor at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School. The reception, totally informal, will run from probably 5 – 6:30 p.m. or so at 23 Everett Street, Cambridge, MA. No matter if you’re for Healey/Hillman or Patrick/Murray, or if you want yes or no on 1, 2, or 3, of if you’re still undecided, please join us!   To contact the Berkman Center, click here.

Here's a group list of resources online for teachers

At St. Hilda’s and St. Hugh’s today, I’m talking with an extraordinary group of teachers at a NYSAIS workshop. The topic is using technology in teaching. We’re going to build a list of resources we’ve talked about today for posterity. Who’s first?

Eduforge.org

A meta resource for technology and education, including sharing of information and tools and the like

Digg.com

An RSS aggregator with a social component

Rojo.com

Another RSS aggregator

Delicious

A tagging service and search engine

Moodle

A course management system or content management system, which is open source

Second Life

A virtual world in which some classes are taught

Wikia

A wiki service, related to Wikipedia

JotSpot

Another wiki service

Creative Commons search

A means of finding works online that you can re-use in the classroom, or that your students could use

TechnologyBites

A new blog on tech and teaching

H20
A best-of-breed, free/open source rotisserie discussion system

H20 Playlists

A place to share reading lists, course syllabuses, and the like, with support for cool things like OPML

Congratulations, Global Voices Community

As Rebecca MacKinnon reports, Global Voices today won the Knight-Batten Award for innovation in journalism. It’s quite an accomplishment, for which literally hundreds of people can take credit. GV has been a runaway success since RMacK and Ethan Zuckerman kicked it off not so very long ago. I’m so happy for everyone whose hard work has made this recognition possible. Thanks are also owed to those loyal, trusting souls who have supported GV and the Berkman Center through funding and high-level guidance for this project, including Chris Ahearn and Dean Wright at Reuters, John Bracken at the MacArthur Foundation, Hivos, and others. The best still lies ahead for the GV community, and the GV experiment, I have no doubt.  (Here’s more, from NZ).